Bubble algae problems

Discussion in 'Algae' started by bmshehan, Sep 2, 2008.

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  1. morau89

    morau89 Fire Shrimp

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    i think that doing it manually with tweezers or something is a good way. They don't pop that easily.
     
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  3. bmshehan

    bmshehan Fu Manchu Lion Fish

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    I think that will be my next course of action. I just hope it doesn't go ballistic on me, I've done everything I know of to stop it the right way... so now plan B. With no skimmer I'll have to be careful not to pop them though... I'll keep everyone updated, and more advice is welcome!!
     
  4. missionsix

    missionsix Super Moderator Staff Member

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  5. photo-guy

    photo-guy Flamingo Tongue

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    This is exactly why I stick to 30 gallon tanks or smaller.

    I'm not creating a 'microcosm'. Nope. I think that creating some 'slice of the ocean' is one of the biggest misconceptions of this hobby. There's just way way too many unsolved problems for that. For example, in 20 years I've never seen a good answer for bubble algae.

    This hobby is more like gardening. Bottom line is that sometimes you gotta put your hands in there and pull out the weeds. Often. Let us all stick our hands in there. All together now! Grab them! Pull them out! Oooyah!!!

    I find that the better my water conditions and lighting, the more stuff wants to grow in it. Some of the stuff I don't like. Just like in a garden. So, I find that the ultimate answer is -- keeping water conditions perfect to slow down growth of those nastly lower food-chain pests, selecting an aquarium of a size that I have time to 'garden', and spending the time that's needed to pull the weeds.

    If I ever see a better answer, I'll let you know.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2008
  6. KeithCrow2000

    KeithCrow2000 Plankton

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    I had several "levels" of bubble algae. I had small bubbles and large ones. I placed 3 emerald crabs in the tank (90 gallon) and they made quick dinners of those small bubbles. However, they would not touch the big bubbles.

    My solution for the big bubbles so that it wouldn't spread was to remove them as part of my water change process. I use one of those syphon tubes that connects to the faucet with running water to produce the suction. I used the large tube end and placed it right over the larger bubbles and popped them. They got sucked up and didn't spread the spores in the tank. The little bit that was left the crabs cleaned right up.
     
  7. reef goddess

    reef goddess 3reef Sponsor

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    Get some phosban or a phosband reactor to help slow the growth of your algae, do get a few emerald crabs just keep an eye on them when they get big, and the rest is pita manual removal. I have popped tons of bubble algae since I've been in the hobby and its never made my algae spread, they are just full of saltwater. They are actually easier to remove when they bubble algae is in good sized clumps, because a lot of times it will come completely off the rock. My purple tank eats it too, but that's not a guarantee. Bubble algae isn't fun but fine grape caulerpa and brown slime are a lot worse.

    The timer on the lights of one of the tanks I maintain malfunctioned a couple months ago. The lights ended up staying on nearly 4-5 days before anyone caught it. I have been battling serious brown slime algae ever since. Only now is it slowly starting to go away and the corals are recovering.. So it could be worse, trust me. lol
     
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  9. photo-guy

    photo-guy Flamingo Tongue

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    Same kinda idea as KeithCrow ...

    In the past, I have used a small 1" long small diameter piece of rigid clear plastic tube and cut one end into kind of a pointy spoon shape for digging out the bubble algaes. Stuck the other end into long flexible plastic tube. Started a siphon and used the 'spoon' to pry loose and vacuum up bubble algaes. If they broke all that got suctioned up anyway.

    Secret is to use a nice long and thinner (small diameter) flexible tube for siphon so it can be easily moved around and turned every which way when going after those little rascals. The thinner flexible tube also gives a slower siphon so you have time to mess around.

    Since siphon is relatively slow, turn off all the pumps so everything goes up the tube instead of getting blown around.
     
  10. bmshehan

    bmshehan Fu Manchu Lion Fish

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    Thanks for the advice everyone, keep any more ideas comin!
     
  11. johnmaloney

    johnmaloney 3reef Sponsor

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    younger emeralds eat algae more than the older ones. If it is in a little area, I would banish the rock to the QT. Do you have green or red bubble algae. If you are going to manually remove use the good old turkey baster and with the plunger depressed, place the hole of the baster over the algae. With your other hand use something like a credit card to scrape it off while letting go on the plunger sucking it up. Dump outside the tank, (obviously right?) and repeat until it is all gone. If you seem some come back, hit it again.
     
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  12. missionsix

    missionsix Super Moderator Staff Member

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    How's the battle going bm?