My new DIY tank design

Discussion in 'I made this!' started by Infantry1327, Jul 20, 2009.

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  1. Geoff

    Geoff Teardrop Maxima Clam

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    You realize you will have to vodka dose this tank...lol.
     
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  3. horkn

    horkn Giant Squid

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    I am glad someone went there!

    ;)

    The way the stand looks, if you don't want the tank in that spot, you can use a forklift and move it;)


    Remember the 5 p's, Prior planning prevents poor performance.

    It ooks like you have everything under control on that aspect:)
     
  4. Infantry1327

    Infantry1327 Fire Shrimp

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    Lol, If my fish are going to drink then they are going to man up and drink whiskey. hahaha I did go a little over board on the stand but this is just a first design and I may lighten it up. But we will see. Of course I am going to plan out every detail. Thats all I can afford right now. lol But when I do build this tank i will make a DIY video so everyone can build one. But I may wait to post it untill there is another DIY contest and I can win some stuff. lol
     
  5. horkn

    horkn Giant Squid

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    Yeah, the DIY video contest. If I would have been done by the time the contest was going and recorded the tank construction on video, I have a feeling I would have gotten a good number of votes.

    Actual tank build threads always attract many posts. Building a plywood tank all DIY gathers even more folks.
     
  6. Infantry1327

    Infantry1327 Fire Shrimp

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    So I have been thinking about the overflow for this tank, and I am on the fence. I don't know if I should do a center overflow or a side overflow. is either one proven to give better results. I am thinking that a side over flow may be more benificial considering the side will be right over the sump and It would probably be easier to plumb and give me more flow. Plus I could plumb the return and put a couple power heads on the oppisite side for wave makeing. The waves flowing towards the overflow would probably help push alot of the crap out to. What do you guys think?

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  7. oceanparadise1

    oceanparadise1 Fire Squid

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    WOWWWWWWWWWW is all i can say this is gonna be GREAT aka TOTM material!!! cant wait to see this build in affect man idk how i missed this thread!
     
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  9. Infantry1327

    Infantry1327 Fire Shrimp

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    hahaha, yea I have started collecting some of the equipment. The protein skimmer will be hear on tuesday. I got a aqua-c EV-180. I also picked up a 55g tank to use as my sump. I decided to get the essential equipment first and I have a few more tools to buy. I need a new table saw and table router. But I just got a second job so I can afford this tank sooner. lol talk about addiction. I should be picking up the wood in about 3 weeks and ordering all the epoxy.
     
  10. ReefSparky

    ReefSparky Super Moderator Staff Member

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    That's an interesting design, infantry1327. I've toyed with a couple of imaginary scenarios too. IMO, ideally, a coast-to-coast overflow might be the best of all worlds in its ability to both skim the surface, and leave no water un-skimmed--if that makes sense.

    In your picture, I like the center overflow design, and think that if your could swing it, have the returns in the front corners of the tank. This way, it would really flesh out your statement above of "The waves flowing towards the overflow would probably help push alot of the crap out too..... " One clean way I envision to accomplish this would be to use two vertical pieces of trim, one on either side of the furniture encasing the tank--to hide the returns.

    I'm just kind-of thinking out loud here, and don't know if this would work, if it's practical, or worth the trouble. But I will say that you made a fine illustration with Sketch-Up, and it really shows how a picture is worth a thousand words!

    Nice thread!! :)
     
  11. Infantry1327

    Infantry1327 Fire Shrimp

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    Thats exactly what I was planning to do if I do the center overflow. I was thinking about haveing 2 external return pumps. 1 for the sump and 1 for the refugium. The original design )picture 2. You can kind of see the returns in the front corners. I have been considering haveing the sump return line branch off to 2 return lines and return to the tank in 4 seperate heads. 2 on each side of the center overflow. The refugium lines will run to the front 2 corners and again branch off to 4 return heads. But I have been considering just plumbing the sump to the front left corner and the refuge to the front right corner. then throwing 2 power heads on the the left and right wall.

    I was originally wanted to do a closed loop system but I am now thinking it will be alot easier to get wave makeing abilities with power heads
     
  12. ReefSparky

    ReefSparky Super Moderator Staff Member

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    There are a few schools of thought on PH vs. closed loops. Some arguments for either include that closed provide a cleaner look, if that's important to you. Some stress how powerheads provide only laminar flow (which is true), but if they're aimed properly, they pretty effectively mimic ocean movements, at a more reasonable price than a full-on closed loop done with certain equipment. Otty states in reef_guru's thread some advantages of closed loop include.. ..

    (cut and paste)

    1. No heat added to water
    2. There would be less power used with one pump then having equal gph in PH's
    3. Adding voltage to the water and if it shorts then all your livestock goes with it.
    4. All the cords hanging in the tank looks cluttered and un-engineered.

    (end cut and paste)
    I think I like best the most expensive arrangement (of course!) :) This is to use a beast of a pump independent of the return pump; and hook it up to a device that alters the flow via a spinning drum (I forget the name, but Otty I think uses one, and Reef_Guru is about to employ one on his new build). Without using procuct names, it's NOT the device that's molded plastic, or maybe rubber, but rather this is a several-hundred dollar rotating drum-type device that's reliable over time, and does what it's designed to do--and KEEPS doing it, unlike the former product that's known to get gunked up.

    The result is a varying number of return outlets, each of which receives a burst of water, in sequence, which IMO most realistically simulates actual ocean movement, without the use of powerheads.

    It's expensive, but you have effectively a wave-maker without motors that turn on and off. The operation is smoother, more realistic, and if planned correctly; yields a superior scenario.

    My "final" build, when my wife and I buy our last home, will use this design; if she allows me. :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2009