How to Avoid Being Stung by your Venomous Fish.

Discussion in 'Lionfish Lair' started by Renee@LionfishLair, Jul 3, 2012.

to remove this notice and enjoy 3reef content with less ads. 3reef membership is free.

  1. Renee@LionfishLair

    Renee@LionfishLair 3reef Sponsor

    Joined:
    May 16, 2010
    Messages:
    2,895
    Location:
    Coastal So. cal
    Keep your eyes open, move slow and pay attention.


    Tips to reduce your odds of getting stung:

    - When cleaning the tank, have a spotter who can let you know where the fish is at all time or if they can't see them at all.

    - Before you clean the tank, feed the fish well. Like men after a Thankgiving meal, they'll go lie down.

    - If you are cleaning the tank solo, don't get too wrapped up in what you are doing and take your eyes off the fish for too long. Think of it as driving. You mainly have your eyes on the road (fish) and periodically you look away to text or apply make-up (take your eyes off the fish to clean).

    - Again, if solo, don't turn your back to the fish. If the fish is on the right side of the tank and you are cleaning the left, use your left hand, not your right, which will position you with your back to the fish. If that doesn't make sense, try it, you'll see what I mean.

    - Make sure the fish is easily visible in your tank. (translation.... clean the glass first!!!!!).

    - Keep up on maintenance. Doing a little light maintenance a couple times a week is better than a monthly sweat and scrape.

    - Spot the fish BEFORE you start working in the tank. Some may think if they don't see them, they are ok. I grant you, that's when you'll get struck.

    - Note when the fish is less active and schedule your tank maintenance in that time frame.

    - Make sure the tank is an appropriate size for the fish. If you have a whale in a nano, there's not going to be much room for your hand, thus increasing your risk.

    - Use a scraper on a stick or a pick up stick.... thingy or a magfloat whenever possible. The less you are in there, the smaller the risk.

    - They can sting you even when they're dead. The venom lasts longer than you'll be able to handle the smell, so use prongs if you can. Depose of dead fish (RIP) in glass containers when possible to protect others.

    - Leave alone your tank when tanked. Seriously. If you wouldn't drive after a certain number, don't do tank maintenance after that number.

    - Know the warning signs that a fish has gone into a defensive posture. They will typically erect their dorsal spines and assume a head-down position, thus bringing their daggers to bear in the direction of the perceived threat. Don't be like those people in the horror movies that ignore when they hear "Get Out!" whispered in their ear. Be smart and get out.



    Smart reefers stay safe. Stupid behaviors result in stupid outcomes.


    *disclaimer: I do not advocate texting/applying makeup while driving*.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2012
    2 people like this.
  2. Click Here!

  3. schackmel

    schackmel Giant Squid

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,153
    Location:
    St. Louis
    great advice! K+

    Soo true! The time i got stung was when i wasnt watching where the fish was compared to where my hand was and basically stuck my hand myself with his fins into my cuticle! I dont think the fish even moved, i just hit him with my hand being careless
     
  4. Corailline

    Corailline Super Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Messages:
    19,652
    Location:
    It is a dry heat, yeah right !
    Great write up, thanks Renee.

    Enjoyed the humor mixed in.
     
  5. Renee@LionfishLair

    Renee@LionfishLair 3reef Sponsor

    Joined:
    May 16, 2010
    Messages:
    2,895
    Location:
    Coastal So. cal
    Figured they better laugh now because they won't be later.......


    Tomorrow

    First Aid: What to do when you don't heed my words.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. epsilon

    epsilon Feather Star

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2009
    Messages:
    752
    Location:
    Toledo, OH
    oooh a cliff hanger even. Definitely interested though, being a former "lucky" owner of a Lionfish I must say I have pondered what to do in the event of a mishap. Curios what the treatments are for the different venom's.
     
  7. schackmel

    schackmel Giant Squid

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,153
    Location:
    St. Louis
    it is so great for someone so knowledgeable to get on here and post the facts of keeping these fish. There is so much mis-information out there. Thank you!!!!
     
  8. Click Here!

  9. Renee@LionfishLair

    Renee@LionfishLair 3reef Sponsor

    Joined:
    May 16, 2010
    Messages:
    2,895
    Location:
    Coastal So. cal
    That's nice for you to say. Thank you.
     
  10. epsilon

    epsilon Feather Star

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2009
    Messages:
    752
    Location:
    Toledo, OH
    Wonder what ever happened to part two?
     
  11. Renee@LionfishLair

    Renee@LionfishLair 3reef Sponsor

    Joined:
    May 16, 2010
    Messages:
    2,895
    Location:
    Coastal So. cal
    Oops!

    I copied this from our Lionfish article in my signature.

    "First aid for a lionfish sting is immersion of the affected area in hot water (114°F) for 20 up to 90 minutes, or until the pain subsides, in order to inactivate the thermolabile components of the venom. The reason for applying heat to the wound is because lionfish venom is composed of heat labile proteins, and the heat actually denatures the venom. Please, don't use scalding-hot water, as the resulting burn will likely do more damage than the venom. To ensure the proper temperature have a cooking thermometer on hand.

    Don't worry, unless you happen to be allergic to the venom, your life really isn't in danger from the effects of the venom. Bee venom is totally different and being allergic to one does not mean you would be allergic to the other. That being said, you need to guard against secondary infection of the wound as well as make certain that there are no pieces of the spine left in the wound, which can cause infection. A tetanus booster is recommended if it is past due. To that end, you may want to seek professional medical assistance, just in case."

    :)