"bowl" rock -vs- base rock

Discussion in 'General Reef Topics' started by Steve34, Sep 3, 2010.

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  1. 2in10

    2in10 Super Moderator Staff Member

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    More of the ecosystem angle. Plus you don't know where it was harvested. Some volcanic rock can also lower your pH.
     
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  3. Steve34

    Steve34 Feather Star

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    ah should have known it was too good to be true.

    Makes me wonder about the lfs guy he thought it was the best thing for saltwater tanks since sliced bread.
     
  4. 2in10

    2in10 Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Profit and sales
     
  5. Steve34

    Steve34 Feather Star

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    Stopped in at one of the local places that deals heavily in saltwater and, while rummaging through the dry rock bin, noticed they had a ton of this bowl rock so I asked them about it. They swear by it, 1.20 per pound and they have it in their main display tank in the store - probably 100-150 pounds of it. He said that he's never seen problems or any type of parameter issue while having this rock.
     
  6. Tankscrub

    Tankscrub Plankton

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    BOWL ROCK is just inert stones collected from certain areas with hard hitting tides. Basically a tide pool type of stone. I understand it's a late reply hurt haven't seen anyone put in any useful info on it. The pores on the rocks come from being constantly hit by sand and water, mainly saltwater, which causes the pores to form. It's inert and won't effect your parameters. The only thing is, it tends to be dusty and dirty from being constantly stacked and fragile.
     
  7. Tankscrub

    Tankscrub Plankton

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    Here's a basic reference to what happen to the rock... the more and larger pores the harder it was hit by water. Besides that a majority of them are inert and actually are NOT lava rocks.
     

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