90 Gallon Build Thread

Discussion in 'I made this!' started by ReefSparky, Jun 1, 2008.

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  1. ReefSparky

    ReefSparky Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm not sure I know what purple stuff you're looking at. Maybe it's my GSP while closed up? What page and post number?
     
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  3. mic5486

    mic5486 Astrea Snail

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    sweet looking tank man!
     
  4. Powerman

    Powerman Giant Squid

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    Ya Sparky... where ya been, whatca been up to?
     
  5. tatted4ever

    tatted4ever Clown Trigger

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    Damn..... pressure is on for some quality pics of the setup :D
     
  6. CVFD02

    CVFD02 Plankton

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    15Amp vs 20 Amp?

    ReefSparky,

    I am new to the forum and am starting my first 90 Gallon build. I noticed that you are using a 15Amp GFCI, I just purchased a 20Amp not installed yet. Do you think that the 20 is to much should i exchange it for a 15Amp. Thank you for your help.

    CVFD02
     
  7. ReefSparky

    ReefSparky Super Moderator Staff Member

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    By code, the ampacity of a receptacle is not to exceed that of the circuit. So a 20A receptacle on a 15A circuit is in violation. The ultimate gatekeeper is the circuit breaker, but the chance one takes is hoping that the circuit breaker will trip before a fire is started. A true 20A device will have the left plug at a 90 degree angle to the right plug. Visually, that's the difference b/w the two receptacles. By installing a 20A receptacle, you've just made possible the attachment of a load that can draw more amperage than for which the circuit is rated. That would be hazardous, but in reality, you'd be hard pressed to find a 20A device that you'd use in your home.

    BTW, the ampacity of the GFCI receptacle has nothing to do its ability to save a life. A 20A GFCI receptacle will trip in the same scenario as a 15A GFCI receptacle.
    In short, I wouldn't do it for fear of the future tenants of the bldg.
     
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  9. FaceOfDeceit

    FaceOfDeceit Hockey Beard

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    Well put. I've had to replace a lot of devices in my current house due to people putting 20A on 15A circuits. I use a lot of 20A stuff in my shop, which is attached to my house. ;D
     
  10. CVFD02

    CVFD02 Plankton

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    Thank you all for the fast reply I will get a 15Amp and return the 20 Amp, Have a great day.:)
     
  11. blackout21

    blackout21 Plankton

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    reefsparky is right about the code. They say that more because of the wire size problem, each gauge of wire is designed for a certain amount of amps. You wouldnt believe how many times i have gone on service calls and have seen melted wire because people think that you can just upsize a breaker and plug when ever you need more amps. A breaker is actually designed to trip when it reaches 80% load, so you really dont get what the breaker says it will do. There is really not much of a need for a 20a plug in a house, except for some appliances, they are more made for commercial applications.
     
  12. Reeron

    Reeron Blue Ringed Angel

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    He could use a 20a GFCI "IF" he has a properly rated circuit for that outlet (20a circuit breaker and 12 gauge wiring running from the panel to the outlet). Unfortunately, almost all circuits in a house are run for a 15a circuit (14 gauge wiring), so the 20a outlet would allow the 14 gauge wiring to be overloaded and possibly melted. If he doesn't know whether or not he has 12 gauge wiring, then he should assume it's 14 gauge, and use a 15a GFCI outlet.