Zoo eating snails.

Discussion in 'Inverts' started by omard, Aug 23, 2007.

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  1. omard

    omard Gnarly Old Codfish

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    Seem like every time I turn around I discover some new "nasty" in tank.

    Noticed some dead areas on one of my favorite zoo rocks that is well covered with zoo's...a couple of days later, found these guys gnawing away on rock.

    They have to have been in it for a long time as I have added no corals for months. Only thing I have added are starfish to feed harlequins. These guys have been hiding out well.

    There is no question that they are eating the zoo's or at least killing them off by smothering them maybe:confused:

    These are the only two I have found so far. Hope there are not more to come. :-/


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2007
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  3. amcarrig

    amcarrig Super Moderator Staff Member

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  4. omard

    omard Gnarly Old Codfish

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    Thanks...you hit nail right on head...crap, hope there is not a bunch of them hiding out somewhere. --- was wondering where zoo's were going...

    Going to be up all night with a flashlight next few nights. :mad: [​IMG] :mad:

    [​IMG]



    Of all of the coral predators this may perhaps be the most encountered by the reef aquarist. The Sundial snail (Heliacus Areola) has a very distinct pattern and is fairly easy to distinguish this species from other snails. The pattern almost resembles a checkerboard in some cases. At any rate these snails prey upon Zoanthus colonies and
    often tuck themselves away tightly between polyps during the day. Like many of the predators the Heliacus Areola is also a nocturnal feeder and does tend to gorge itself on wiping out the entire colony, instead the consumption pace is a bit more steady. Gone unnoticed you may attribute the losses to natural causes. The snail makes a small hole at the base of the polyp and actually sucks out the contents. The remanding flesh of polyp typically decays and falls off shortly after. This tiny foe is not one pleasant addition if you prize your Zoanthus collection.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2007
  5. coral reefer

    coral reefer Giant Squid

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    Yuk, Hopefully, I don't find them anywhere in my tank! I just like happy things!
     
  6. omard

    omard Gnarly Old Codfish

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    "...happy things!..." --- All I want also.

    Found the two snails on one zoo rock...never seen elsewhere. And I have lots of zoo's - which I keep a very close watch over.

    Got up 3X last night to look for with flashlight. Found none. Hopefully that is all that are there.

    Goes to show, you should QT everything going into tank.
     
  7. omard

    omard Gnarly Old Codfish

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    Oh, happiness!

    No more sign of snails.

    Zoa's so prolific they have already overgrown the two quarter size "dead spots" created by the snails on my favorite zoo rock...spots were in about center of rock.

    (upper right)

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    I think it is right that zoanthid colonies grow much faster if part of them are threated some way.

    ;D
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2007