what is basically relation between calcium,magnesium,ph,alkaline and iodine?

Discussion in 'Water Chemistry' started by nybatu, May 22, 2008.

to remove this notice and enjoy 3reef content with less ads. 3reef membership is free.

  1. nybatu

    nybatu Bristle Worm

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2008
    Messages:
    132
    Location:
    new york
    actually i was wondering what can i do to have stabile numbers and what should be my numbers on these, i didn't know i can test my iodine. also purple up and kent marine calcium was my last purchase for reef tank. i put both 1 full cup (5 ml) to my tank and i turn off my skimmer 1 hour.
     
  2. Click Here!

  3. Seppish

    Seppish Fire Worm

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2008
    Messages:
    170
    Location:
    Savage, MN
    From what I was told and understand is that in order to even bring calcium up, you need to bring up the Magnesium. The mag. acts as a binder or something for the calcium. Keeping your alkalinity up (or carbonate hardness...samething) keeps your PH in check, they are directly related to each other, for instance tonight I tested my water for both KH and PH, well the KH was low (at about 7), so I immeadietly knew the PH was going to be out of wack, and sure enough my PH was at 8.0. Kalkwasser will control both KH and Calcium ( and PH) but is dangerous stuff if you don't know what you are doing. I bought a jug of it, but still haven't touched it cause I am unsure on what to do with it. Don't waste your money on Purple up, if Coraline is going to grow it will grow. My advice s bring up the magnesium then the calcium and get Kent Superbuffer to raise the KH when it drops to control the PH. PLEASE ANYONE ELSE READ THIS AND MAKE SURE I AM RIGHT THIS IS MY FIRST "SCIENTIFIC POST"
     
  4. inwall75

    inwall75 Giant Squid

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2003
    Messages:
    7,172
    Location:
    America
    Iodine doesn't have any relation with any of the other above elements

    Calcium and Carbon (alkalinity or CARBONate hardness) are on a see-saw with each other. Proper Magnesium helps the see-saw swings of these two elements stay smaller which is good thing. Hopefully, that makes sense. Proper alkalinity levels has an effect on how much pH swings up or down. So, while Calcium doesn't directly impact pH.....if you overdose it, you are going to drive down your kH which will then impact your pH.

    This anology is factually wrong in some areas but it's still quite useful as it helps people visualize it.

    CalcAlkMar
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. lunatik_69

    lunatik_69 Giant Squid

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    7,933
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    From my understanding, ph, alk/dkh are related(cousins) then theres Cal and Mag. A good level of Mag will help in having stable Alk and Cal. Alk and Cal are oppisites, if you have Cal high, then you'll have low Alk and visa versa. Of course these three elements are only important if you have a reef tank. Iodine doesnt play a role in this story, unless you dosing it and MUST test for it. The general rule is, if your going to does it, you MUST test for it. Luna
     
  6. Tangster

    Tangster 3reef Sponsor

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2006
    Messages:
    5,644
    Location:
    Va/Ct
    I was thinking the same thing with the Iodine .. I have yet never found a reason to dose that . And when I did try it many yrs ago all I ever saw an increase in was algae..

    What I'd use as an analogy would be the Calcium and Carbonate ions are charged differently one being positive the other negatively pretty much like cleaning magnets Now if you try to force then together for storage or use and you have them opposing themselves on the opposite poles they will just fly apart and not want to bond up you'd have to nail them together:) Pretty much like the Ca and Carbonates do then you align the magnet polarity plop they get jammed up and jelly tight .. And will hang together like two ticks on a hound dog.. The magnesium is the special secret sauce :) or ingredient that turns them to align up.
     
  7. rayjay

    rayjay Gigas Clam

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2004
    Messages:
    885
    Location:
    London, ON, Canada
  8. Click Here!

  9. rayjay

    rayjay Gigas Clam

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2004
    Messages:
    885
    Location:
    London, ON, Canada
    Actually, I should have posted the link to his "sticky" on Reef Chemistry Links, as I believe it to be the single most important page on the internet for my hobby. It has been moved from his old forum to the archives at RC.
    Link to Randy's Links
     
  10. Tangster

    Tangster 3reef Sponsor

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2006
    Messages:
    5,644
    Location:
    Va/Ct

    I guess it was 95 97 or so He jumped all over me for stating Iodine was not needed he had data as to its needs as part of NSW But he had just gotten into the hobby with his big 90 LOL and that data site was just kicking off. Well I guess I can rest easy now :) I guess ten yrs of experience has taught him the differences between a tank and a real ocean ? Thats why I guess I'd read the dribble if I did not no better ?
     
  11. wildreef

    wildreef Stylophora

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2008
    Messages:
    978
    Location:
    Louisville, KY ( derby town )
    Iodine has been noted to reduce algae growth , I dose mine and have absoulutly no unwanted algea .
    Amoung other benifits, iverts such as shrimps/ordamental shrimps need iodine to molta s well as most soft corals suach as leathers.
    I have been speaking with *geekafied* on this iodine matter ( i didint realize it till he noted after he's seen my tank )
    Either by having a good dsalt mix + adding iodine for the correct iodine ppm or salt mix (stand alone) that has the correct amounts already present .
    he'd asked if i dosed for it , and thus i replied yes , and we both agree as well as some others it doe's help control/kill algae growth.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2008
  12. amcarrig

    amcarrig Super Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2004
    Messages:
    9,219
    Location:
    CT
    Where?

    Have you read this article?

    Chemistry and the Aquarium