Velvet or something else?

Discussion in 'Fish Diseases' started by TravisVT, Jul 19, 2014.

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  1. TravisVT

    TravisVT Fire Worm

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    Does this look like Marine velvet or something else? I've had a rough few days. Lost my Atlantic blue tang and my Wardley wrasse this morning. The wrasse did not have any signs of disease on him. The tang had brown spots and appeared almost like the skin was peeling. All of this happened overnight which makes me wonder if it's velvet or something else. I know Brooke can attack really fast but not sure what that looks like. Both clown fish have white peeling skin on them, the three chromis appear to be fine.
    Any idea what I am dealing with?
     

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    Last edited: Jul 19, 2014
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  3. Corailline

    Corailline Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Brooklynella, just google images of marine fish or clowns with Brooklynella and you'll see what I mean. Pealing skin description is a common comment with this parasite. When was the last time you introduced fish and what kind of fish?
     
  4. TravisVT

    TravisVT Fire Worm

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    The last fish I introduced was a lawnmower blenny about 2 months ago but I moved him to another tank after about a week because he cleaned up all the algae in this tank. Prior to that the latest addition was blue tang well over a year ago. Is it possible the blenny brought it in??? I hope not because that means this stuff is in my other tank
     
  5. Corailline

    Corailline Super Moderator Staff Member

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    It is a dry heat, yeah right !
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  6. TravisVT

    TravisVT Fire Worm

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    Thank you corailline
     
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  7. Corailline

    Corailline Super Moderator Staff Member

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    You're welcome and good luck.
     
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  9. DSC reef

    DSC reef Giant Squid

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    Good luck. Brooklynella is a nasty parasite and almost had me to the point of tanking down my 125. Oddly enough my maroon clowns survived as did my large sohal tang and red coris wrasse. I lost a couple angels and a nice male blue throat trigger. It killed me loosing those fish.
     
  10. Bob F

    Bob F Bristle Worm

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    Definitely sounds like Brooke. I lost all my fish to it except sailfin tang and chromis. My chromis never showed any signs as well good luck. I went fallow for over 9 weeks while tang and chromis were in HT
     
  11. TravisVT

    TravisVT Fire Worm

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    Did you treat your tanks or just leave then fallow for a few months? I haven't decided what I am going to so yet. This Tank is in my dining room which I was planning on redoing so I might take this opportunity to break it down. If I go that route, what can I do with the live rock as I do plan on either resetting up this system or custom build a 120. Would this parasite live on the live rock during that time?
     
  12. Corailline

    Corailline Super Moderator Staff Member

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    LIFE CYCLE - Once reproduction has taken place, the newly formed protozoa is able to freely swim by the use of its ciliates and able to find a new host or more usually, attach to the same fish its "parents" are on, which is why you will note such a rapid progression of this parasite. Attachment usually occurs at the gills of the fish first and spreads outwards as they multiply, as this parasite feeds upon the fish, it also releases toxins that can prove fatal to the fish very quickly. Free swimming protozoa can persist for quite some time without a host to feed upon. As such, any aquarium that has had this parasite introduced to it, must remain fallow (fishless) for no less than four weeks in order for the remaining free swimming parasites to die off without a host to feed upon. As such, all fish within the aquarium must be put into a quarantine tank and treated, while being kept out of the main aquarium during that four week period.
    Chucks Addiction:
    http://www.chucksaddiction.com/brookynella.html
     
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