Solatube Display at OC Fair

Discussion in 'Reef Lighting' started by Matt Rogers, Aug 12, 2011.

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  1. amcarrig

    amcarrig Super Moderator Staff Member

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  3. mikejrice

    mikejrice 3reef Affiliate

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    UV can be used in VERY specific cases because it looses intensity quickly in water. Corals that come from deeper, like most the stuff we keep, cannot handle it and will quickly burn out from it. Shallow tidal crest hard corals are about the only ones adapted to live under UV, and will develop more pigment to protect it's zooxanthellae. I personally would not try to use it because I don't have the attention span to build a bio-tope specific enough.
     
  4. m2434

    m2434 Giant Squid

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    In the scientific literature, as far as I've found uv is bad. Nothing I've come across suggests it's good, but I'm very interested if Mike or someone else has a reference. As to coloration, in the hobby literature, there is lots of stuff suggesting that uv increases coloration. However, as far as I can tell this seems to be a misinterpretation of the scientific literature. there is an increase in pigmentation in response to uv, but it's in the form of MMAs, which are clear. There are however pigments that may be produced in response to intense lighting, but not specifically UV, although presumably it could be UV if intense.

    And as was mentioned MHs shield UV. Likely though the glass probably will allow a very small amount of UV-a to pass through and will not block near UV High Energy Visible light (HEV). Perhaps these have an effect on coloration, but I don't think anyone has good information on this. The specifics of coloration are poorly understood at best.


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  5. Dingo

    Dingo Giant Squid

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    it is the wavelength in question. UVA, UVB, or UVC are the three classifications. As far as we are concerned, only a small amount of UVA enters our tanks... but with increased UVB and C the DNA in the zoox will in fact be fused with thymine dymers due to the radiation and they will die off.
    Also, as M stated, the UV does not help with growth, however it will noticeably enhance coloration (mostly in secondary pigments).

    As i would suspect with the solatubes, they probably block 100% of UVA, B, and C so you will not get any UV at all (however the corals in the ocean are used to this anyways because UVB/C light dissipates within a few inches/feet anyways). Of course, you could add some VHO or T5 that will emit violet/blue wavelengths that are close to that of UVA and they will essentially "trick" the coral into producing additional secondary color pigments.

    Solatubes will be natural sunlight so they will have a color temperature between 6500k and 10000k based on your part of the world. all needed wavelengths will be present, however the combinations of wavelengths used in our hobby to promote the fancy coloration will not be present... supplementation must be added to promote this otherwise you will not get the bright (or fake as some people may say) colors :)
     
  6. m2434

    m2434 Giant Squid

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    Are you referring to perceived coloration or an actual physical change due to pigment production? Certainly, certain pigments will "glow" in response to uv, but other than say the s-320s (which are all MMAs i believe) I'm not aware of pigment production, in response to uv specifically.


    EDIT: BTW I keep typing MMA when I mean MAA. Sorry, must be friday...

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    Last edited: Aug 12, 2011
  7. rc_mcwaters3

    rc_mcwaters3 Clown Trigger

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    dont know about the rest of ya'll but that does seem cheeper to run natural daylight vs any other type of light ;D
     
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  9. malac0da13

    malac0da13 Torch Coral

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    According to this most UV shields are only blocking uvb and uvc and only blocking almost 1/3 of Iva. http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=970572 From something else I read though says uva is in the visible range and is the purplish/actinic color.

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  10. haloist

    haloist Skunk Shrimp

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  11. malac0da13

    malac0da13 Torch Coral

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    That's kinda meet but not very practical. Doesn't leave much usable space lol

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  12. Dingo

    Dingo Giant Squid

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    there is an 8 part series by Dana Riddle on pigmentation in response to certain wavelengths and the production of various chemoproteins due to certain wavelengths. have you stumbled upon the series?
    Dana discusses two or three UV based proteins, MAA's are one of them. I have been taking Dana's data and manipulating lighting conditions. A majority of the perceived color I am referring to is typically a response to the very high UVA and violet wavelengths... most of the time it is seen as a (for lack of better word) metallic sheen that will develop in certain areas of the coral. But then again, everyone sees coral colors differently so it could just be my eyes picking up certain hues?