Ply Wood Tank Help

Discussion in 'I made this!' started by kramfinz, Jan 27, 2009.

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  1. JasonSquared

    JasonSquared Spaghetti Worm

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    This is MAS epoxy tinted black. I believe that the recomendation is that you DO use tinting as the UV may cause it to yellow anyway. I don't think I'm giong to use any on mine as it will all be covered in coralilne anyhow... Seems to be a waste of $, and this is any area that I'd feel comfortable cutting corners...
     

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  3. tigermike74

    tigermike74 Panda Puffer

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    45º angles are a breeze with a good old miter saw. :) Nice work!
     
  4. kramfinz

    kramfinz Astrea Snail

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    I think I about have all this worked out now just a couple more opinions and i'll be good to go. What type of plywood to use? My local Home depot carries two top quality plys. one is maple and one is oak. the maple looked better to me. Anyone have any ideas on glue to use? I would think it really doesn't matter since everything is sealed with epoxy. Could probably use a liquid nails product. They are 100% waterproof. I also plan on using the pour method when applying the epoxy. That looks like the best way to do it, with the best results.
     
  5. JasonSquared

    JasonSquared Spaghetti Worm

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    We've used gorilla glue, however I think that a liquid nail type glue would work fine. As far as plywood, you can use AB Pine, or even AC, but I have used poplar and would definitely recommend it. It's easier to work with than Maple or Oak, and plenty strong. You should be able to get it at HD or lowes, although you may need to order it or wait until an order comes in, which is what I had to do. However I only used plywood for the back and bottom. I used poplar 1-by for the panels where the glass will sit. ANd I just used pine 1-by for a eurobracing.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2009
  6. JasonSquared

    JasonSquared Spaghetti Worm

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    The 45*s are easy until you are connecting an X,Y and Z axis in the corners...
     
  7. kramfinz

    kramfinz Astrea Snail

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    Jason- If the epoxy is as strong as everyone says it is, why would you need 45's for reinforcement? I think you are the only one i've seen so far that has used them. It looks great and of course it will add stability but do you really think it's necessary? I want to do it right but like i said mine will be surrounded by concrete on 3 sides. Seems like it might be overbuilding a bit(which of course can never hurt)
     
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  9. JasonSquared

    JasonSquared Spaghetti Worm

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    True it probably is over building, but if there is a place where the tank will fail, it's there. The epoxy will be more than enough if done right, but there are two things that I'd like to add that make this added piece of mind necessary.

    1. Every glass tank has a tension seal between the glass panes. That is that the pressure of the water pushing on it is trying to split the panes apart. PW tanks are different in that it's a compression seal. The pressure of the water on the glass is actually making the seal tighter.

    2. The only place this isn't true is in the corners of the plywood joints. The 45* pieces alleviates this and turns what would otherwise be a tension seal into a compression seal. But instead of using silicone here, it's wood, glue and epoxy that is being compressed into any voids adding to the strength, and the overall rigidity which affects the compression seals on the glass.

    Hope that helps. It would be easier to draw some sort of animation but I don't know how...
     
  10. kramfinz

    kramfinz Astrea Snail

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    Thanks for the input but I think because of how my tank will be installed in the wall i'm going forego that part. Is there any way you could give me some fairly detailed instructions on how you use the pour method for doing the epoxy?
     
  11. JasonSquared

    JasonSquared Spaghetti Worm

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    Have you ever sealed a blacktop driveway? Pretty much exactly like that. Pour it on the surface, then squeegie it across... I'll see if I can get another picture...

    Another thing you may want to consider instead of the 45's, is using a some fiberglass, wetting it out and then going over it with the epoxy in the corners. I'd seriously recommend strengthening these corners... It's easy, (other than those compound mitered cuts) cheap, and adds to the dimensional stability of the tank. Imagine your tank flexing from a rectangle to a parallelogram (it would be minute but would happen when water sloshes). Over time it will strain the compression seals on your glass. This will prevent that. And it's really easy - Some 2x4's, some glue, a couple screws, and you're done.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2009
  12. kramfinz

    kramfinz Astrea Snail

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    Are you actually using a little sqeegie when you do that?
    I have never done any fiberglass work. What do you mean by wetting it out?
    I have a compound miter saw. How did you get such long 45deg cuts? I have only ever used mine for small cuts like the end of a peice of moulding.
    Jason, you are very helpful by the way. I started a new thread on flow rate for my built in overflows. If you have a sec check that out as well, your opinion would be appreciated.