PH, CO2 & Ventless fireplace have in common? Trouble

Discussion in 'Water Chemistry' started by Otty, Dec 10, 2007.

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  1. Otty

    Otty Giant Squid

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    Well just had a good learning experience.
    This is the first winter with my 265g and it sits in the basement where I heat with a ventless fireplace to save on electricity.
    Well with physics you use oxygen and fuel to burn fire which results in CO2 being released. With CO2 in my basement I then had less oxygen in the air for my tank. After about 5 days of this running the fireplace my PH had dropped to a staggering 7.7 before I noticed my elegance looking funny. :-[
    After taking a half day off work and mixing Arm & Hammer I have got the PH back up to the low 8's and added a Dolphin 5 star air pump and 4 air stones to the sump for added oxygen.
    Never thought about less oxygen being in the air for the tank, guess I need to bring in some fresh outside air to keep this from happening again.
    Just a FYI

    Thanks for the help Tang-mister. ;D;)
     
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  3. baugherb

    baugherb Giant Squid

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    Always something. thanks for the heads up>>>>
     
  4. reef_guru

    reef_guru Humpback Whale

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    would be interersting if this was in the thread "what went wrong?"
     
  5. JustPhish

    JustPhish Peppermint Shrimp

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    If you're going to use one of those in your home then I gotta advise that you place a CO detector in the same room the fireplace is in and another high up in the house. Try and keep the one in the room up high if possible. Also remember that they take cumulative hits so over time ot's going to go off as the amounts adds up on the sensor. But it;s so worth it.

    Finally, if you run a piece of airline tubing from the air intake on your skimmer to a window you should be able to alleviate any problems like that in the future.
     
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  6. Matt Rogers

    Matt Rogers Kingfish Staff Member

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    Great advise. I am becoming aware of the dangers of CO[SUB]2[/SUB] from owning a boat with a gas inboard motor. ;) I like the skimmer idea as well.
     
  7. Otty

    Otty Giant Squid

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    We have a CO2 detector in the house, would never turn on a fireplace like that without one. Had a heat exchanger break on my parents furnace and calasped my father after breathing it all day, good thing he didn't go to sleep that night.
    I will work on the inlet to the skimmer, sounds like a good idea.;D
    Thought about that but I thought it needed it's own title and I'm bad about burning through a thread when people start to jabbing in them off the topic. There is a link now to it.
     
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  9. Camilsky

    Camilsky Montipora Capricornis

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    Just my 0.02$:
    The most efficient chemical control of CO[SUB]2[/SUB] in water: high/constant pH + elevated temp.
     
  10. Otty

    Otty Giant Squid

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    It has taken me 6 TBS of Laundry Soda to get the PH up in to 8.2. I am hoping I can get more oxygen in the basement before I turn the fireplace back on again.
     
  11. Tangster

    Tangster 3reef Sponsor

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    Now who'd a thunk it ??? Oh I also wanted to add its not just vent less logs But all fuel burning units and the fact that in the last 35 yrs newer homes have been built airtight as possible with improved windows and all homes are now wrapped in tyvek and are pretty much air tight since the early 70's , And then just from natural respiration and cooking and everything that is done inside a home to deplete oxygen then it will raise the CO'2s in the process. Even in the old days we always left a window cracked for fresh air every night and day..I added a 15% fresh air make up ducting on the A/C . And as I mentioned I pump in fresh air for the tank 24/7
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2007
  12. JustPhish

    JustPhish Peppermint Shrimp

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    LOL you need a CO detector. CO is colorless and odorless and can kill quickly when everyone just thinks they have a cold or a flu.