ich

Discussion in 'Fish Diseases' started by junior279, Oct 24, 2012.

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  1. junior279

    junior279 Spanish Shawl Nudibranch

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    Added my first fish to my tank after it cycled. It was a clown fish . Noticed some white spots and a couple of days later the fish stopped eating so I treated it with ich attack. The fish died a couple of days later. How long should I wait be for I add another fish? I have some snails an hermit crabs in the tank now. I have been checking all my levels with my test kits and they are good. I have a 75 gallon tank with 90lbs of rock.
     
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  3. Corailline

    Corailline Super Moderator Staff Member

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    It is a dry heat, yeah right !
    Ich attack will not be an effective treatment for Marine Ich.

    Your tanks must remain fallow for 6 weeks, some say as many as 72 days.

    The link below is a good read.

    Marine Ich - Myths and Facts


    Make sure you had the right ID. Check images of Brookynella as well, both diseases look very similar.
     
  4. junior279

    junior279 Spanish Shawl Nudibranch

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    Location:
    Belmont, Ohio
    ok thanks looks like a long wait. It is safe to add corals?
     
  5. Corailline

    Corailline Super Moderator Staff Member

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    It is a dry heat, yeah right !
    Any thing that carries moisture has the potential to carry the parasite.

    With that said, you may very likely re-introduce it to your tank again.

    My advice is to let your tank continue to cycle a few more weeks, makes sure water quality if up to par and feed quality foods.

    Marine ich is an opportunistic parasite, fish become symptomatic when stressed.
    Stress can come from poor water quality, over crowding, acclimation, aggression from other fish, and inadequate nutrition.