Does anyone keep red reef safe starfish???

Discussion in 'Inverts' started by Indiana Boy, Jul 13, 2011.

to remove this notice and enjoy 3reef content with less ads. 3reef membership is free.

  1. Indiana Boy

    Indiana Boy Coral Banded Shrimp

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    Messages:
    389
    Location:
    Southern Indiana
    Hello! I am interested in buying a red starfish (reef safe),(Fromia milleporella).
    Does/has anyone kept any of these creatures in a reef tank. If so, what is their life expectancy, most time anyone has kept one, certain requirements, etc. I read the write-up on liveaquaria.com and some other stuff online but would like to hear personal experience before adding one.
    Thanks!
    JP
     
  2. Click Here!

  3. proreefer

    proreefer Feather Star

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2011
    Messages:
    776
    Location:
    georgia
    maybe this will help


    Family: Ophidiasteridae
    Range: Indonesia
    Size: Up to 5 inches
    Diet: Omnivore
    Tank Set-up: Marine: Coral or rock, coarse sand
    Reef Compatible: Yes
    Tank Conditions: 72-78ºF; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4
    Temperament: Peaceful
    Venomous: No
    Care Level: Moderate


    The Red Starfish, or Red Sea Star, of the genus Fromia may be various shades of red. It has multiple black pores (dots) on its surface. The tips of the arms are the same or a lighter color than the rest of the arm, differentiating it from Fromia indica.
    It generally lives alone, but if the aquarium is large enough to support more than one, it will tolerate others of its own species. It requires a mature tank with algae and is generally fairly self-sufficient in the aquarium, finding enough micro-organisms and detritus to scavenge if live rock is present. It is diurnal. It is intolerant of copper-based medications and high levels of nitrate, and is very sensitive to changes in specific gravity, temperature, salinity and pH of the water, and oxygen levels. Avoid exposing a Red Starfish to air or sudden salinity changes, as this is detrimental to its health, often resulting in bacterial infections and necrosis of an arm, or possible death.
    The Red Starfish is extremely difficult to breed in an aquarium, with no distinguishing characteristics to help differentiate it from its mate.
    If there is insufficient algae growth in the aquarium, the diet should be supplemented with flaked foods, and small pieces of fish or mussel.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. Indiana Boy

    Indiana Boy Coral Banded Shrimp

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    Messages:
    389
    Location:
    Southern Indiana
    Thank you for the write up. Great info. Does anyone have any input on their life expectancy in the reef aquarium?
    Thanks!
     
  5. civiccars2003

    civiccars2003 Great Blue Whale

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2010
    Messages:
    2,827
    Location:
    Akron Ohio
    Well said...
    I have one in my 55 gallon with 20 gallon fuge. I have had it for four months. Really seems happy in my setup.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. Indiana Boy

    Indiana Boy Coral Banded Shrimp

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    Messages:
    389
    Location:
    Southern Indiana
    thank you for your feedback, civiccars2003.
    I am looking forwards to purchasing one. It seems as though it would make a neat, colorful addition to my 55 reef.
     
  7. just fins

    just fins Plankton

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Indiana
    Yes There is a Reef Safe Starfish

    I just happened to come across your post doing a search for saltwater, and I had to register to just let you know that yes there is a reef safe starfish.

    I was in the same boat as you really wanting a starfish, but my husband wouldn't let me put one in his coral reef aquarium because of the many trouble they cause. One evening I was doing research for different starfish and trying to find one that could possibly work and came across the Linckia Starfish, Linkia laevigata.
    Description:The Blue Linckia, is a five-armed (once in a while 6-armed) Starfish exotically colored in orange. These Stars feed on algae found on aquarium glass, rockwork, and substrate. They are completely reef safe and are a must have for anyone with either a fish-only or reef tank.
    Diet:
    If introduced to a large well established aquarium, very little needs to be done to supplement Linckias. The bacterial film that comprises the mainstay of the Linckias diet usually appears in abundance in well established and seasoned aquariums.
    Notes:
    Starfish are intolerant of sudden changes in oxygen levels, salinity and pH of the water, and cannot tolerate copper-based medications. Extra care and time should be taken whenever acclimating this animal.The drip acclimation method is highly recommended for all Sea Stars due to their intolerability to changes in water chemistry. Linckia Starfish must never receive exposure to air during acclimation.
    Level of Care:
    Moderate
    Reef Compatibility
    :Very good

    This sea star is truly remarkable. The information I added is from a saltwater dealer online, and is about the blue linkia starfish. After I found this I did research on them and my husband was convienced that I could add one. I seached the different kinds of linkias and the colors available and the required parameters. I have found blue which is easiler found in your LFS. Orange, Bali red, purple (which is more rare and expensive), and a dalmation linkia (which is what I chose and purchased) At times they are known to grow more legs, and the leg that broke off of mine is growing into a new linkia starfish. He has caused any issues or anything, the bad thing about him is I don't get to see him as often as I would like.

    I hope this helps if you haven't found what your looking for.

    OBTW I'm an Indiana girl ;)


     
  8. Click Here!

  9. Reef-a-holic

    Reef-a-holic 3reef Sponsor

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2011
    Messages:
    480
    Location:
    KC, MO
    Linkia star's tend to be a crap shoot due to the fact they are very sensitive. Probably 75% or more do not survive because of poor handling / acclimation before the hobbyist ever even gets them. Fromia stars are still sensitive, but have much higher survival rates. Red serpent stars can be harder to find, but are the hardiest of all...they tend to be a bit more reclusive though.
     
  10. Corailline

    Corailline Super Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Messages:
    19,652
    Location:
    It is a dry heat, yeah right !
  11. civiccars2003

    civiccars2003 Great Blue Whale

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2010
    Messages:
    2,827
    Location:
    Akron Ohio
    I agree with Corailline. That article is great. I waited almost nine months to get mine. I believe you need to have a well established tank in order for it survive long term. I have had mine for three months and it is very active, colorful and one of my favorites. A
     
  12. mikejrice

    mikejrice 3reef Affiliate

    Joined:
    May 24, 2009
    Messages:
    5,762
    Location:
    Colorado
    Acclimation is the key to fromias. Drip it slowly for as long as you can stand before putting it in and you will stand a much better chance. They are not as bad as linkias, but they can still be hit and miss.