Deltec NFP509 Nitrate Filter Review.

Discussion in 'Filters, Pumps, etc..' started by JaysLittleOcean, Jul 14, 2015.

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  1. JaysLittleOcean

    JaysLittleOcean Spaghetti Worm

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    I have been religiously testing my aquarium water every week without fail. And I have noticed that my nitrates after my cycle have been constantly at 20 ppm for the past few weeks. I can attribute this most likely to the daily feedings of frozen fish food and my filter socks. I'm also not the biggest fan of doing large water changes but that is a completely separate topic. So I need to find a way to reduce my nitrates without using exhaustive media that needs to be replaced frequently as my work schedule would not allow for such things. The answer that I may have found might just be the Deltec NFP509 Nitrate Filter. In a nutshell this little piece of equipment provides a place for the anaerobic bacteria that is responsible for utilizing nitrate and phosphates (from my reading) as part of their food source along with a carbon based fluid (1 part Vodka, 3 parts RO/DI) as their food. The result a Nitrate and Phosphate removing group of bacteria that can put a smile on my face. So lets see if this thing actually works.

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    Assembly of the unit was simple It consist of just attaching the included Aquabee recirculation pump to the platform at the top of the body and connecting the water exit fitting. There is an included Probe Port that will allow you to install an ORP from your manufacturer of choice. This is an absolutely necessity in my opinion as it will allow you monitor the oxygen level present within the water inside the chamber.

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    You can bring water in from your aquarium sump to the Deltec NFP509 Nitrate filter in a variety of methods. Besides the pump you will find two tubes (one with a built in check valve, which is used to feed the reactor with your nitrate fluid). The other is used to allow water from your aquarium to be injected into the reaction chamber fed by the recirculation pump. In my opinion their should have been a check valve here as well as I will elaborate on later on.

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    I choose to feed mine initially using a Deltec Peristaltic Pump but eventually discovered that the slow rate of feed would hinder operation once the bacteria colony grew and my water flow level raised to accommodate this growth.
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    I installed the Deltec NFP509 Nitrate Filter underneath my aquarium stand next to my sump and connected all the fittings.

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    I went through the entire recommended process of starting the culture. Which involved adding water from your sump and then shutting off the feed pump to the Deltec NFP509 Nitrate Filter to isolate the water to bring the oxygen level down over the course of three days. During this time the recirculation pump is still running and you will be adding a dosage of nitrate fluid (1 part Vokda and 3 part RO/DO Water) twice per day and this is based on your device size so mine was 4 ml of Nitrate Fluid twice a day. During this process I monitored my oxygen level drop from 200 to 64. You will continue doing this until the 3rd evening at which you will turn on the feed pump and adjust the flow to 1 drop every 3 second from the Deltec NFP509 Nitrate Filter. You will continue this every three days slightly adjusting flow and the nitrate fluid used while you measure both the nitrate level from the effluent and the aquarium itself. The idea is to get to a flow where your aquarium nitrate is zero and the effluent is zero and stay feeding that amount of nitrate fluid.

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  3. JaysLittleOcean

    JaysLittleOcean Spaghetti Worm

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    I began the process of bringing the anaerobic bacteria culture online as directed in the Deltec Manual. The Deltec NFP509 Nitrate Filter feed pump was to be turned off for a period of 3 days to isolate the water within the reaction chamber from the rest of the system. The internal re-circulation pump is still functional but this process allows the oxygen within the water to decrease and provide the ideal environment for the bacteria to grow. I was originally using the Deltec Peristaltic Pump to feed the reactor, but soon discovered that I could not not control the level of flow and determined that to be a huge problem. I also was not able to locate another aquarium grade peristaltic pump that could meet the future demands on the flow of water through the Deltec NFP509 Nitrate Filter due to the tubing on the injection port. Well sometimes you just have to go back to simple. I decided to pick up a Tom's Aqualifter Diaphragm dosing pump and using a control valve I'm able to regulate the proper flow of aquarium water thought the filter. Note, that the tubing on included on the Deltec aquarium water feed port is slightly larger than standard airline tubing which gave me a nice surprise and dosed my 3 day oxygen deprived water with tons of air and left my with a nice cleanup because the check valve I used to initially feed the pump just fell out. I solved this problem by removing the tubing that came with the Deltec NFP509 Nitrate Filter and heated up some regular airline tubing and connecting it that way. The fit is tight and it definitely wont come off again without a fight.

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    Deltec has a few different methods in which the Deltec NFP509 Nitrate Filter can be operated. I was originally going with the manual method where I would be responsible for not only dosing the Nitrate Fluid (1 Part Vodka, 3 Parts RO/DI Water) twice a day but also manually adjusting the flow of aquarium water into and out of the reaction chamber. This was done using a standard syringe and it was time consuming. Every morning and every evening I would measure the fluid out, inject the fluid, clean the syringe,put the nitrate fluid away and close up the stand. So with the fact that I work about 20 hours a day most days I needed a better option. So I went with the recommended semi-automatic method where the fluid is feed into the reactor using a dosing pump. I didn't own a dosing pump ad there were many on the market to choose from. So I did some research and visited a local reef ship in Connecticut and purchased the Jebao DP-4 Automatic Doser for this purpose. Now I normally go for the best money can buy. But in all honesty I also don't like throwing away money for no reason as well. And I couldn't pass up the great reviews and accuracy that this dosing system received. So far I have not been disappointed with it and I will create another post to review it alone. Deltec Recommends that the doses in manual mode be administered twice a day. but now with an auto dosing system in semi-automatic mode if is recommended to spread the dosing amount per day within 4 doses for a more stable environment for the bacteria. I am now currently dosing 2 ml of Nitrate Fluid every 6 hours for a total of 8 ml of Nitrate Fluid a day and I couldn't have done it without my doser!

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  4. JaysLittleOcean

    JaysLittleOcean Spaghetti Worm

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    A day has passed since I started the feed pump to the reactor and allowed the effluent from the Deltec NFP509 Nitrate Filter to flow back into the aquarium at a rate of 1 drip every 3 seconds. I used my nitrate liquid test kit to measure both the levels of nitrate from the effluent and the water from the display. Honestly I was shocked to see that the Effluent was the brightest yellow I have every tested. The display obviously still shows nitrates being detected at 10 ppm. Unfortunately, this is attributed to the fact that I added a Tiger Tail Cucumber to my aquarium and died after acclimation. I however was only able to removed half of the body. The other half is wedged inside the base of the rocks. But back to the main topic. The Deltec NFP509 Nitrate Filter works... and works well! I am also monitoring the reactor with my Neptune Systems Apex Controller. As long as my ORP level reads 0 then were good to go!

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  5. Servillius

    Servillius Montipora Digitata

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    I have to admit when I first saw this I thought it was silly. Why not just dump the carbon into your sump like everyone else.

    After reading your review I realize this may be a great way to get impressive controllability over the reaction. Nice device.

    Great review, thank you.
     
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  6. JaysLittleOcean

    JaysLittleOcean Spaghetti Worm

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    Thank you and you are most welcome. My goal overall is to present reef enthusiasts with the good and the bad of my of my experiences with equipment and my reef in hopes that it can both educate and assist people with their own aquariums.
     
  7. FaceOfDeceit

    FaceOfDeceit Hockey Beard

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    Deltec is top notch equipment! Great customer service as well. Following along.
     
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  9. JaysLittleOcean

    JaysLittleOcean Spaghetti Worm

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    Good to have you tagging along.
     
  10. JaysLittleOcean

    JaysLittleOcean Spaghetti Worm

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    So one of the key components required to run the Deltec NFP509 Nitrate Filter properly is the Nitrate Fluid. What is this magic fluid? Its just a simple mixture of 1 part Vokda (not flavored Vokda, I used Smirnoff) and 3 parts purified water, preferably RO/DI water. Feed the Nitrate Fluid into the reactor starting at 4 ml twice a day either manually being injected using the included syringe or via a dosing pump if you prefer to go automated and the anaerobic bacteria inside the reactor will love you! And in return you will get nitrate free water (once the bacterial population is large enough). But you will need a storage container to keep your mixed fluid. I didn't go the route of having a fancy dosing vessel. My wife is into canning so I liberated one of her Ball Mason Jars and used that to mix and store my nitrate fluid.

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    A simple Ball Mason Jar for mixing and storing my Nitrate Fluid.

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    3 parts of RO/DI water.

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    1 part of Smirnoff Vokda added to the 3 parts RO/DI Water.

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    Mix it up and you have your Nitrate Fluid.


    I initially was manually injecting the Nitrate Fluid into the reactor once at morning and once at night. I work pretty much most of the day. So this began to be a little troublesome to me. So I decided to setup my reactor in the semi-automatic method and use a doser to inject the nitrate fluid for me. I drilled a hole through the Ball Mason Jar lid large enough to put silicon airline tubing through and purchased a doser to do the job for me. I now have more precise control than I could every have done myself and I inject 1 ml of Nitrate Fluid 4 times per day. The doses area spread out more frequently in smaller amounts to provide for a more stable bacterial colony.

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  11. Av8Bluewater

    Av8Bluewater Giant Squid

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    What's the difference between this and regular carbon dosing?
     
  12. JaysLittleOcean

    JaysLittleOcean Spaghetti Worm

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    This method provides a dedicated environment to breeding anaerobic bacteria which convert Nitrate into Nitrogen. Basically a more controlled environment which yields greater results.