Algae removal

Discussion in 'Algae' started by oldfishkeeper, Aug 1, 2015.

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Do you have to scrub your rocks?

  1. Yes

    2 vote(s)
    28.6%
  2. No

    5 vote(s)
    71.4%
  1. oldfishkeeper

    oldfishkeeper Giant Squid

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    I'm just curious how many of us need to do this? If so, what do you use? and if not, what do you attribute this success to?
     
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  3. Mr. Bill

    Mr. Bill Native Floridian

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    To be honest Mindy, even when I had an algae "problem", I refused to scrub my rocks. The real problem here is the mentality that algae is bad- it is not. It feeds on the excess nutrients that would otherwise cause serious water quality issues, and it provides a food source for your herbivores/omnivores and CuC. If you have excess microalgae growth, then you have a nutrient export problem that needs to be addressed properly for long-term success. I've seen many tanks crash after the aquarist scrubbed their rocks to remove algae...
     
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  4. Vinnyboombatz

    Vinnyboombatz Giant Squid

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    Mr. B is very wise. I do however like to gently blow (syringe) detritus build up off the rocks from time to time.
     
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  5. Va Reef

    Va Reef Giant Squid

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    Yeah I always tell people, algae isn't necessarily bad, as long as you eliminate the cause of the algae, it'll eventually go away on its own, while safely eliminating the nutrients fueling its growth.

    The only algae I would actively remove would be bubble algae, I hear that stuff is nasty.
     
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  6. Mr. Bill

    Mr. Bill Native Floridian

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    Yes, this, as well as lightly vacuuming the surface of your sand and rocks while removing water for a water change will help greatly with nutrient control. :)
     
  7. DSC reef

    DSC reef Giant Squid

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    I run bio pellets, GFO and carbon. About every 5 months I give the rocks a good scrub that have coral growing on them.
     
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  9. zesty

    zesty Sailfin Tang

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    this... it's what I don't want to hear, but it's the (hang your head) truth. haha! I'm dealing with a little cyano. I knew I was adding more nutrients, I had done more aggressive water changes, but I also recently threw on some GFO.

    That being said, if you have some rocks that you can grab and scrub. I'd do that at water change time and then fight it both ways! :D

    You could always up your CUC, just don't want to add too much and then it/them starve after eating everything (so to speak).

    Hope you get some headway! :)
     
  10. Corailline

    Corailline Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Nope, it's really not effective in the long run. That intervention is too invasive for me.

    Chitons, urchins, snails, abalone, some hermits....Control of nutrients, phosban, phosgard...lower bioload.
     
  11. AnotherMike

    AnotherMike Fire Worm

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    I've actually never had typical algae problems, but I have had some doozys. First I had bryopsis break out in my frag tank. That I treated with tek M and very careful Manual removal. I was very pleased that I was able to control it very very quickly. Second I had (have) lobophora (Google that one). Bryopsis made me nervous, lobo terrified me...and still does. Manual is not an option and To date the only thing that has worked on it was a blonde naso tang. He was able to control it, but not eliminate it. Sadly, my other tangs harassed him to his demise and the lobo is spreading again. . The scary thing with lobo is it will grow on top of my acros and kill them.

    Cyano is the only thing I would actively remove from my tank and rocks. I've had that in the past and I would use a turkey Baster to blast it then suck it out. Otherwise, I look to the root of the issue and address it.